Healthcare Reform: What About Free Riders?

One of the most potent objections to government-backed universal healthcare is the problem of free riders. John Smith said in 1608, “he that will not work shall not eat.” Getting something for nothing offends the American sense of fairness. But is this the right way to think about healthcare? Let’s look at free-rider claims and … Continue reading Healthcare Reform: What About Free Riders?

Campaign Ad on Healthcare Is Misleading

In the final days before the November 2018 election, Representative Scott Perry (R-Pennsylvania) launched a campaign ad that criticized his Democratic challenger's support for universal healthcare. Rep. Perry drew a negative comparison to Britain’s National Health Service. The ad was misleading. Below is my Letter to the Editor on the subject. The Letter was posted … Continue reading Campaign Ad on Healthcare Is Misleading

So, You Want Competition to Bring Down Healthcare Costs? – Then, Logically You’re Talking Single-Payer

Debates over fixing U.S. healthcare often end up with each party choosing a side – either “Competition” or “Government.” But in a strange twist of politics, logic, and the broken healthcare market, turns out that Competition and Government are on the same side. Let me explain… In order for there to be competition, there must be … Continue reading So, You Want Competition to Bring Down Healthcare Costs? – Then, Logically You’re Talking Single-Payer

Reframing Healthcare Reform: Cost-benefit, Systems Engineering, Both?

Fixing U.S. Healthcare blog has championed the success of the Oregon Health Plan of 1994 (OHP), and has attributed its success to cost-benefit analysis.  But was cost-benefit analysis really the key factor in its success? Or did the OHP succeed for other more fundamental reasons? And what are the implications for healthcare reform now? My answers … Continue reading Reframing Healthcare Reform: Cost-benefit, Systems Engineering, Both?

W. Va. Settles Teacher Strike But Not the Problem of Healthcare Cost

  West Virginia teachers settled their strike March 6 when they reached agreement with the Governor and Legislature giving them a 5 percent pay raise. But according to State Senate president Mitch Carmichael and Craig Blair, Senate Finance Committee chair, at least some of the $110 million yearly cost of the contract would come from … Continue reading W. Va. Settles Teacher Strike But Not the Problem of Healthcare Cost