Healthcare Reform: Where to Start?

Fixing U.S. Healthcare blog has made the case for reform that reins in spending in the whole system. But where possibly to start on such a massive undertaking?  Here are four ideas. Klein’s “Muddling incrementalism” Redefining Price’s “essential benefits” using Oregon-style cost-benefit analysis Rosenthal’s “Salami strategy” Emanuel’s “low-hanging fruit” Let’s look at each one. Idea #1:  … Continue reading Healthcare Reform: Where to Start?

Reframing Healthcare Reform: Cost-benefit, Systems Engineering, Both?

Fixing U.S. Healthcare blog has championed the success of the Oregon Health Plan of 1994 (OHP), and has attributed its success to cost-benefit analysis.  But was cost-benefit analysis really the key factor in its success? Or did the OHP succeed for other more fundamental reasons? And what are the implications for healthcare reform now? My answers … Continue reading Reframing Healthcare Reform: Cost-benefit, Systems Engineering, Both?

Needed:  A New Idealism to Guide Healthcare Reform

Fixing U.S. Healthcare blogsite has laid out the mounting need for healthcare reform and a compelling case for Oregon-style cost-benefit approach as the foundation for it. But this blogsite’s reasoned arguments from history, politics, finance, and ethics are not enough. Americans need a rekindled core idealism to impel them toward reform. Here are three key ideals … Continue reading Needed:  A New Idealism to Guide Healthcare Reform

New Data from AMA Journal Rekindles Calls for Healthcare Reform

The Journal of the AMA (JAMA) on March 21 released the most comprehensive study to date on U.S. healthcare spending. It confirms that Americans are spending too much, and getting too little. But it also gives us some new insights on what’s driving up costs. The study has been widely reported in mainstream media – … Continue reading New Data from AMA Journal Rekindles Calls for Healthcare Reform

Doctors Critique Oregon-Style Cost-Benefit Approach to Healthcare Reform . . . But Not So Fast!

Noted surgeon and social-medical commentator Atul Gawande MD hosted a video roundtable in 2014 entitled “Avoiding Low-Value Care.” His panel seemingly challenged the idea that low-value care can be avoided, which is the crux of the cost-benefit approach to healthcare reform. But on closer look Dr. Gawande and panel may actually, in fact, be validating … Continue reading Doctors Critique Oregon-Style Cost-Benefit Approach to Healthcare Reform . . . But Not So Fast!