Healthcare Reform: Is the Message Getting Out?

Is the message of this blog getting out?  The Gallup Poll’s annual survey suggests so, with one exception.  Here are some of Gallup’s key survey responses with my comments.   Availability & Affordability How do you feel about the availability and affordability of healthcare in the nation? Conclusion: American dissatisfaction with availability and affordability is … Continue reading Healthcare Reform: Is the Message Getting Out?

“Single-payer healthcare is socialism!” – Why That’s Wrong & Wrongheaded

There are two technical reasons that the “socialism” claim is wrong:  First, single-payer does not mean government-single-owner.  Second, single-payer is best understood as a public-private hybrid, which is fundamentally different from socialism. This blog has avoided over-politicizing the healthcare reform debate.  It has, in fact, cautioned Americans to steer clear of inflammatory loaded words like … Continue reading “Single-payer healthcare is socialism!” – Why That’s Wrong & Wrongheaded

What If U.S. Healthcare CAN’T Be Fixed?

What if Americans are too divided to reach any common ground? Or what if healthcare has become so rigged and so enmeshed that it can’t be untangled?  Or what if vested interests have become so powerful that they can’t be overcome? Not so fast, claims the Beyond Intractability project championed by Heidi and Guy Burgess based … Continue reading What If U.S. Healthcare CAN’T Be Fixed?

Needed:  A New Idealism to Guide Healthcare Reform

Fixing U.S. Healthcare blogsite has laid out the mounting need for healthcare reform and a compelling case for Oregon-style cost-benefit approach as the foundation for it. But this blogsite’s reasoned arguments from history, politics, finance, and ethics are not enough. Americans need a rekindled core idealism to impel them toward reform. Here are three key ideals … Continue reading Needed:  A New Idealism to Guide Healthcare Reform

FAQ: Could a Healthcare Reform Plan Designed for a Single State Work at a National Level?

Could an approach used 23 years ago by a single state, targeted only at its Medicaid program, be applied on a national scale for reforming the vast U.S. healthcare system? The answer is Yes. Oregon in 1994 decided to cut services instead of cutting patients in response to a Medicaid budget squeeze. The governor used … Continue reading FAQ: Could a Healthcare Reform Plan Designed for a Single State Work at a National Level?