Rethinking the Cost-Benefit of PSA Tests

Was this Fixing U.S. Healthcare blog wrong to single out PSA as not worth its cost? This was the claim in two previous posts, including the overall most popular one, The Problem of Diminishing Marginal Benefit in Healthcare. Some new information suggests that we need to rethink that original claim. Prostate Specific Antigen Since prostate … Continue reading Rethinking the Cost-Benefit of PSA Tests

Wages Are Up, But Whittled Down by Rising Healthcare Costs

  Wages are up 3.2% for 2018, according the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  So, why don’t we feel 3.2% richer? It’s because relentless healthcare cost increases are eating up one-quarter of our gains. Gross annual pay increased $1,507, but one-quarter of it was taken right out of our paychecks to pay our healthcare premiums. This … Continue reading Wages Are Up, But Whittled Down by Rising Healthcare Costs

Campaign Ad on Healthcare Is Misleading

In the final days before the November 2018 election, Representative Scott Perry (R-Pennsylvania) launched a campaign ad that criticized his Democratic challenger's support for universal healthcare. Rep. Perry drew a negative comparison to Britain’s National Health Service. The ad was misleading. Below is my Letter to the Editor on the subject. The Letter was posted … Continue reading Campaign Ad on Healthcare Is Misleading

Doctors Critique Oregon-Style Cost-Benefit Approach to Healthcare Reform . . . But Not So Fast!

Noted surgeon and social-medical commentator Atul Gawande MD hosted a video roundtable in 2014 entitled “Avoiding Low-Value Care.” His panel seemingly challenged the idea that low-value care can be avoided, which is the crux of the cost-benefit approach to healthcare reform. But on closer look Dr. Gawande and panel may actually, in fact, be validating … Continue reading Doctors Critique Oregon-Style Cost-Benefit Approach to Healthcare Reform . . . But Not So Fast!

W. Va. Settles Teacher Strike But Not the Problem of Healthcare Cost

  West Virginia teachers settled their strike March 6 when they reached agreement with the Governor and Legislature giving them a 5 percent pay raise. But according to State Senate president Mitch Carmichael and Craig Blair, Senate Finance Committee chair, at least some of the $110 million yearly cost of the contract would come from … Continue reading W. Va. Settles Teacher Strike But Not the Problem of Healthcare Cost